Indian Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

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VOLUME 27 , ISSUE 4 ( December, 2016 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

The Response of Rehabilitation Management in Patients Presenting with Locomotor Symptoms of Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome

Sanjay Wadhwa, Pallab Das, Naorem Ajit Singh, R Suresh, Mahiuddin Araf, U. Singh

Citation Information : Wadhwa S, Das P, Singh NA, Suresh R, Araf M, Singh U. The Response of Rehabilitation Management in Patients Presenting with Locomotor Symptoms of Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome. Indian J Phy Med Rehab 2016; 27 (4):104-112.

DOI: 10.5005/ijopmr-27-4-104

Published Online: 00-12-2016

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2016; Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.


Abstract

The benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS) was first addressed by Kirk as a distinct pathology in 1967, as the presence of rheumatic symptoms with generalised joint laxity in the absence of any demonstrable systemic rheumatic disease.

In this prospective, longitudinal, analytical study, we tried to find out the response of rehabilitation therapy in patients presenting with locomotor symptoms of BJHS and selected 61 patients randomly. The rehabilitation protocol followed: Explanation and reassurance, teaching of joint protection techniques and work modification, isometric muscle strengthening exercise (both extensor and flexor muscles), endurance exercise. Clinically most of the patients showed significant overall response quantitatively, in all the parameters.

It can be concluded that the rehabilitation protocol prescribed here is very much suitable both quantitatively and qualitatively for the patients of BJHS.


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